In Darwin’s Footsteps
Andy

Andy

Co-owner

Departing Hobart

We started off at 9am on a lovely Spring morning to ascend kunanyi.  It was Andy and I and we wanted to test this walk– were we crazy to think that walking all the way from Hobart’s waterfront to the top was a good idea?  Traditionally trips up the mountain started closer to the top of her rocky summit.

Following Hobart Rivulet

We started near Salamanca on the shores of the Derwent and the cultural hub of Hobart. We dipped our fingers in the water and of course then got our “before” shot. And away we were!  After skirting the waterfront we made our way to St Davids park, a historic spot which used to be a graveyard (really it still is, its just that the gravestones are now located in one corner of the park).  It is utterly beautiful in there with some very old and wise trees. Crossing two busy roads we find ourselves at the start of the Rivulet track, around 1.5km into the walk. We pass through historical South Hobart, including the world heritage site of the female factory and the old leather tannery and we talk about the importance of this water course for Hobart.

Australia’s oldest Brewery

About 5 kms in we find ourselves at the Cascade Brewery. Luckily its only morning so no desire to stop for a beverage but we do partake in some scroggin (some of you know it as trail mix). We wind up through layers of vegetation – from wet schelorphyll forest (there’s your word of the day), dominated by Eucalypts/gum trees to temperate rainforest gullys where the Tree Ferns sprout like table umbrellas along the track.

Whispering water and soothing forest

We stop beside a river, sip tea and find our conversation slows, as though the whispers of the forest have their own words and they speak instead. The climb gets steeper as we ping pong across many a bridge with the gentle whir of the river to keep us company.

Halfway Hut for lunch

We find ourselves at Junction Cabin – a famous landmark on the mountain where five paths congregate before going on their merry way.  We stop for lunch here – salad wraps, soft cheese, Tasmanian Pepperberry quince paste and another hot drink is consumed before we head off up Hunters Track. The track is different again, with this section showing off large boulders, views and scree fields.  We stop twice along the way, to soak up the view, rest and listen to the squawking Currawongs. After one last push, we reach The Chalet – one of the many huts tucked away on the mountain, if you squint, I guess it looks a bit Swiss, hence the name…

Along The organ Pipes Track

We rest, gulp some water, fill up our bottles, have an apple and continue on along the Organ Pipes Track. This track is one of Tasmania’s 60 Great Short Walks and has been recently upgraded to provide a smooth underfoot experience.  About five minutes in, the weather turns and we find ourselves walking through swirling mist. We walk past the treeline and climb up beyond the cloud and are greeted with a view worth the climb – a layer of cloud nestles around the mountain and we see Hobart and beyond.

One last climb to the top

Rejuvenated by the view and high on our jelly bean sugar snack we make the final climb to the top. We did it!  It’s now 4pm and we are stoked! We crack a beer, crack some jokes and revel in the sense of achievement of the day.  We both can’t stop talking about how iconic and rewarding the walk is.

Discovering Hobart’s Iconic Walk

We admire the River Derwent so far below and feel so pleased to have started on her shores and now atop at 1271m. A wonderful sense of phenomenological unearthing – we think we have just discovered THE iconic walk for Hobart! A great day out, a great walk and we both leave the day feeling truly inspired.

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